Letter to Kaizer Motaung – Continue the Legacy of Kaizer Chiefs

During the beginning of 2015/2016 season, you outlined it clear that coach Steve Komphela’s “mandate is to continue the legacy of Kaizer Chiefs and that is winning.” Before that we operated under the theme Reclaiming the Glory, which was well on track.

I write to you as a supporter of our club, but with concerns about its direction, and I see with many other fans of the club during general discussions and on social media platforms, that I am not alone.

I would like to extend my thanks to the Motaung family and all stake holders for your time, effort and other resources that you are devoting into Kaizer Chiefs football club. I would also like to state that I believe and trust in your leadership, because you have always led with great intentions and it’s clear that your mind is in the right place.

My concern for the state of the club, however, is based on recent performance and the lack of us being in a position to defend any title. I understand that as the league gets more competitive, it will be more difficult to win most of the games but I still believe somehow we should still be able to continue with the Kaizer Chiefs way which is to “defend a title” within a season. I am sure that is evident enough and I need not rub salt to the wound or preach to the congregation. As much as the vision to continue the legacy of Kaizer Chiefs is clear and attainable. I feel the club over the past and current season, has operated under one premise – ‘to rebuild a formidable squad’.
While this is necessary and in no doubt of importance, but some of the actions or decisions taken by the football manager conveys an opposite message and have proved to lack significant depth to be meaningful.

I believe that certain decisions with regards to the changing of the technical team, acquiring, retention and promotion of players to the senior team seems to be done based on emotions and partly well thought. The future is unknown, but I cannot help but wonder what would it bring if the football manager position would be held by someone else, someone who is not born into the position, someone “who would have to apply and be appointed to the position”. Maybe that would exact a certain pressure to the individual to deliver unlike when the position is held by an individual who believes it is his right to occupy such import position. Not to dwell on what Bobby once said but I have come to believe that he is unfit to continue as the football manager of Kaizer Chiefs.

Not that you are not aware, but Kaizer Chiefs is more than just a football club. To most of us it is a sense of pride, an extension of a family that we all strive to keep that loving feeling alive. My question is, how long will the loving feeling continue based on current directionless situation. Is this how you intend to continue running your business?
Kaizer Chiefs should not continue being run on feelings, since feelings should be left to us the supporters. We can no longer claim with pride that we are the greatest in Africa not even South Africa. A few titles locally or the league title in succession, now sounds like a far-fetched wish, sad how all we anticipate is a draw and a win has become the greatest achievement.

We need a vision of how we operate going forward. It seems your long-term vision, as the chairman is not in sync with the football manager’s medium term and not clear filtered down to the coach’s short term. All that the supporters are calling for is that, all must work together pulling in the same direction. This means that the key is hiring the right “person”.

From where I am, maybe it is luck but Mamelodi Sundowns has managed to get it right and stick to their building blocks and it does not require a magnifying glass to confirm it.
It has been repeated that Rome was not build in one day, but Kaizer Chiefs in longer a young lion. Victory should know Kaizer Chiefs as its father and loss should be a bustard with 15 fathers from the PSL.

I would like to finish by again thanking you for everything you have done, and attempt to be philosophical like bra Steve – The blood of Kaizer Chiefs is thicker than the water of the womb.

Love and Peace,
Nyiko Miyen

​MARIKANA, A SAD STORY OF THE UNHEARD

Hlumelo Biko, the son of black consciousness movement leader Steve Biko, has written a book titled “The Great African Society: A Plan for a Nation Gone Astray”. In this book, he introduces the concept of one group of society “othering” another group that is not aligned to their thinking. He says the tendency to “other” people is used to marginalise people in society. “Othering” is a form of identitarian politics that focuses on the class, ideology and exclusive interests of specific groups.

As we today commemorate the 4th anniversary of the Marikana tragedy, we run the serious risk of limiting our analysis to the events that unfolded on 16 August 2012.  Such analysis would be terribly insufficient as it wouldn’t factor in the capitalist greed and corporate arrogance that led to the chain of events that unfolded from 12 – 16 August 2012. Such analysis would not reflect on the callous disregard for workers and their communities by mine owners who are driven only by the profit motive. To these captains of the mines, workers are two-legged beasts of burden who belong to the lowest rungs of society.

A comprehensive analysis would unravel the fact that the Marikana tragedy is a clear example of a situation where people were “othered”. They were perceived as a disruptive mob that was deemed unworthy to be listened to. Very few people will today admit that they were part of a discourse that expressed irritation at the irrationality of the miners’ protest. Security guards were killed, police officers lost their lives, and some of them had been hacked to death with pangas. One mineworker was hacked to death and his remains burned.

The miners, resolutely camped out on the “mountain”, became a source of national fascination.  Stories of miners using water that was laced with muti to make themselves bullet-proof were splashed across newspapers. Horrified callers on talk radio complained that the situation had gotten out of hand. They called on “someone to do something” about the situation.

Lonmin repeatedly said they would not be able to enter into any salary negotiations because the mine already has an existing two-year wage agreement with workers. Citing the Bench Marks Foundation report on the social, economic and environmental impact of platinum mining companies in the Bojanala District, Daily Maverick journalist Greg Nicolson wrote on 15 August 2012, a day before the fateful day, that unless the mining giants transformed their impact on workers and communities, they would be in for a lot more trouble. Nicolson’s words proved to be somewhat prophetic as the situation came to a head the very next day.

In a 1966 interview, Dr Martin Luther King Jr said: “I contend that the cry of “black power” is, at bottom, a reaction to the reluctance of white power to make the kind of changes necessary to make justice a reality for the Negro. I think that we’ve got to see that a riot is the language of the unheard.”

The loss of life, injuries and pain that came out of Marikana will forever remain an indelible blight on the history of post-apartheid South Africa.  The Marikana story is a story of unheard mineworkers, snubbed and “othered” by society. Any analysis on Marikana that discounts the role played by corporate arrogance and greed wouldn’t be complete or honest.

To fully understand the events that played themselves out on that koppie on the 16th of August, one has to be willing to dig deep and go to the root of the matter. We cannot honour the 44 people who died and many others who were injured unless we identify fully the underlying causes of dejection and resultant tensions. 

As Voltaire famously said, “to the living we owe respect, but to the dead we owe only the truth.” We should go beyond the obvious and leave not any stone unturned in trying to find the truth. After all, we owe truth to the 44 deceased.

By Tiyisela Mpuzana

Jesse Williams BET award speech

Peace peace. Thank you, Debra. Thank you, BET. Thank you Nate Parker, Harry and Debbie Allen for participating in that .

Before we get into it, I just want to say I brought my parents out tonight. I just want to thank them for being here, for teaching me to focus on comprehension over career, and that they make sure I learn what the schools were afraid to teach us. And also thank my amazing wife for changing my life.

Now, this award – this is not for me. This is for the real organizers all over the country – the activists, the civil rights attorneys, the struggling parents, the families, the teachers, the students that are realizing that a system built to divide and impoverish and destroy us cannot stand if we do.

It’s kind of basic mathematics – the more we learn about who we are and how we got here, the more we will mobilize.

Now, this is also in particular for the black women in particular who have spent their lifetimes dedicated to nurturing everyone before themselves. We can and will do better for you.

Now, what we’ve been doing is looking at the data and we know that police somehow manage to deescalate, disarm and not kill white people everyday. So what’s going to happen is we are going to have equal rights and justice in our own country or we will restructure their function and ours.

Now… I got more y’all – yesterday would have been young Tamir Rice’s 14th birthday so I don’t want to hear anymore about how far we’ve come when paid public servants can pull a drive-by on 12 year old playing alone in the park in broad daylight, killing him on television and then going home to make a sandwich. Tell Rekia Boyd how it’s so much better than it is to live in 2012 than it is to live in 1612 or 1712. Tell that toEric Garner. Tell that to Sandra Bland. Tell that to Dorian Hunt.

Now the thing is, though, all of us in here getting money – that alone isn’t gonna stop this. Alright, now dedicating our lives, dedicating our lives to getting money just to give it right back for someone’s brand on our body when we spent centuries praying with brands on our bodies, and now we pray to get paid for brands on our bodies.

There has been no war that we have not fought and died on the front lines of. There has been no job we haven’t done. There is no tax they haven’t leveed against us – and we’ve paid all of them. But freedom is somehow always conditional here. “You’re free,” they keep telling us. But she would have been alive if she hadn’t acted so… free.

Now, freedom is always coming in the hereafter, but you know what, though, the hereafter is a hustle. We want it now.

And let’s get a couple things straight, just a little sidenote – the burden of the brutalized is not to comfort the bystander.That’s not our job, alright – stop with all that. If you have a critique for the resistance, for our resistance, then you better have an established record of critique of our oppression. If you have no interest, if you have no interest in equal rights for black people then do not make suggestions to those who do. Sit down.

We’ve been floating this country on credit for centuries, yo, and we’re done watching and waiting while this invention called whiteness uses and abuses us, burying black people out of sight and out of mind while extracting our culture, our dollars, our entertainment like oil – black gold, ghettoizing and demeaning our creations then stealing them, gentrifying our genius and then trying us on like costumes before discarding our bodies like rinds of strange fruit. The thing is though… the thing is that just because we’re magic doesn’t mean we’re not real.

Thank you.

Cry My Beloved Country

image

The ANC is failing to understand that this dates way back before 31 March 2016… this dates back to the days of FNB homeloan awarded to the Zuma family or during 2012 when business man Vivian Reddy confirmed loaning Zuma money used to upgrade Nkandla.

This is beyond Zuma’s awareness of any wrong doing, it is beyond any appology. It is actually worth far more than any amount that treasury can workout and ask or instruct Zuma to payback.

This is more destructing than the loud chants by EFF members, those loud chants we have come to accept and loosely include in our daily sayings. Those words which have been made to mean something only when they are on a bumper sticker or have a hashtag sign and written grammatically incorrect.

Finally, the days of #PayBackTheMoney are over, maybe we will see more active citizens and less creative phrases. Maybe then the ANC will realise the third force was never foreign, but only a missed opportunity to win our hearts.

An opportunity to protect our Constitution with their buttocks has presented itself. Prove to us that they still want our votes.

#FrustratedCitizen

What is in a name?

What good is it, renaming a place or thing in order to preserve the people’s history?
A number of the student houses at “Turfloop” University of the North have been named after African leaders who were once students there and played an active role in fighting apartheid.

It was the first time I came across most of those name and at times, my search of our history is informed by those names. Names that once referred to great thinkers, courageous people, selfless individuals and people like us. Those names today are used to identify a wooden shelter meant for students somewhere in a remote area.

I believe the least we could do is elevate this names, use them to refer to main streets in our communities. Refer to important state buildings, make sure that more people know about this names. Maybe more people would be informed by these names in their search of our history.

Just in case you were wondering, some of the student shelters are named after Tiro, Moshobane and many others.

In an Attempt to Preserve a Language

Do MLfm presentors audition for tv presenting roles or they are just not interested?
I am singling MLfm presentors because they are closest to the happenings at SABC or within the entertainment industry.

Maybe SABC has a mandate to uplift certain languages and ignore some when it comes to tv entertaining shows. Could it be that other languages are not commercial enough and presentors who speak those languages get over looked?

With a new year around the corner and kids from all over Afrika Dzhonga taking big steps towards building a career. How many thought of acting or tv presenting as a career or to those who speak xiTsonga it is a far fetched dream since they hardly see xiTsonga speaking presentors on any prime time shows.

Humans see possibilities if they see their kind doing it, kids aspire for things when they see their kind doing them.

Tsundzuka Yena.

Loko bubutsa ri gonyisa matimba
Loko xihuhuri xi ntlhantlha hinkwaswo
Loko mahlo ya ku ya khanisa mihloti
I nkarhi, tsundzuka yena.

Loko switsundzuxo swa ku swi ri mungwini
Loko miehleketo ya ku yi hlulekile
Loko swa ku swi gedzisiwa-gedzisiwa
I nkarhi, tsundzuka yena.

Loko vanghana va ku papalata
Loko gome ri ringela mbilwini ya ku
Loko swivavi swi tshovelela swirho swa ku
I nkarhi, tsundzuka yena.

Loko u famba ni vunonohwi gondzweni
Loko swindzingwa-ndzingwana swi hlometela
Loko vukhongeri ni ripfalo swi leva ku mbundzuka
I nkarhi, tsundzuka yena.

Masana, mapapa, vuphumeri kumbe ku vonakala,
Mahlamba-ndlopfu, kumbe vungumeri bya munyama
Hambi u dya, swe moo! Vuxaniseki ku ri hava
Na kona, tsundzuka yena.

Hi P.E. Ntsanwisi